Posts Tagged ‘university’

http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2017/08/owes-fluoride-protest-0824

The Fluoride Free Chapel Hill/Carrboro (FFCC)rallied outside Chapel Hill Town Hall to protest against the fluoride in Orange County’s water Wednesday night.

The protests came in response to a cancelled meeting set for Aug. 24 by the Orange County Water and Sewage Authority’s Board of Directors, in which members of the community planned to address the fluorinated water issue. OWASA cancelled all their summer meetings, making it three months without an opportunity for residents to voice their concerns in a public comment meeting.

“Anybody that wants it, wants to put it on topically; that’s your business. You can go to a dentist who will give you a fluoride tray who will put it in there, but don’t put it in the water and medicate me without my permission,” said Mike Willock, a protester and dentist of 28 years.

OWASA suspended fluoridation after the fluoride overfeed, or the OWASA water crises, this past February. Yet on March 9 they decided to resume with the chemical for some time in September.

 

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In Response to the recent over-fluoridation of the community water supply, the citizens make their voices HEARD!

OWASA is extremely upset and disturbed by the awakening public who has forced their hand in revisiting this longstanding practice.  They are doing all they can to perform damage control and avoid negligence in this costly and dangerous disaster but given the fact that we have notified them as early as 2012, they are in an extremely compromised position!

Dear Readers,

Last month I was contacted by a fellow at the Emerging Leaders in Science and Society organization and was cordially invited to discuss the state of the public drinking water in the United States. 

Justin Lana (LinkedIn) further elaborated over a series of emails that he had stumbled upon my anti-fluoride exploits and would value my input for a water quality related project that he is working on at ELISS.  You can read much more about this in our correspondence below. 

What piqued my interest in participation and eventually lead to an hour long discussion is that Justin described the goalpost for the ELISS project being some sort of presentation to members of our water regulatory apparatus in Washington.    While I had no hope that this meeting would be any kind of silver bullet for the fluoride issue I felt Justin was open minded and could potentially influence others in this area. After some scheduling, I eventually agreed to meet Justin for lunch at a nearby Indian restaurant to candidly discuss the “current state” issues from my perspective.

For my own protection and journalistic discipline I will sometimes utilize recording devices when traveling or publicly discussing issues of national import, however do not always publish what is captured.  In this case, I felt compelled to admit after the fact that I had recorded almost our entire conversation without his knowledge and also requested publication rights.  I felt the content of the discussion was valuable enough to deserve it’s own article and what you see here is the result.

While initially hesitant, Justin revisited our discussion and bravely gave me the green light so long as I made some important disclaimers.  So that I can never be accused of skewing anyone else’s words, I am also sharing a truncated series of our email exchanges which give the most comprehensive background concerning this situation.  I hope you enjoy!

Mr. Sturmer,

I’m writing to see if you would be willing to meet with me regarding a project that I am currently apart of Drinking Water in the United States: how do we ensure a safe, sustainable, and affordable future in our communities.

I’m working on this project as part of the Emerging Leaders in Science & Society (ELISS) fellowship program. In short, ELISS is a service leadership program for graduate students hosted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Duke is one of five partner campuses across the USA participating for 2016. More about ELISS can be found at http://www.elissfellows.org or in the attached program flyer.

ELISS2016_H2Oflyer

Our group will be presenting an overview of Triangle specific drinking water issues to individuals involved in federal water policy in Washington D.C. in June.

Next October we will be holding a local forum to discuss the same issue and we will return to DC in December 2016 to present to national stakeholders.

Our team is divided into various roles: health, environment, economic and society.

Given your view points on fluoride and water, and active role you’ve taken in this fight and against the City of Durham, I believe that your knowledge and the voices you represent would be incredibly valuable to our project.

I would be happy to buy you coffee at a location of your choosing or to come by your office for a meeting.

If you would be willing to meet, please let me know your general availability and a convenient location to meet.

Generally I’m free Mondays (1:00 – 5), Wednesdays (12:30 – 4) and Friday (all day).

I look forward to hearing back from you. Please don’t hesitate to write or call if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

Justin Lana

__________________

Hi Justin,

Next monday afternoon would probably work.

I read the pamphlet and browsed the website…Before we meet however could you help me understand what you’re looking to accomplish with the meeting? My website is a good resource of information concerning my viewpoints on the issue so I’m just wondering the purpose…

Either way, let me know some time slots that work for you…noon is best for me but if that isn’t doable I can try to make it work.

Thanks,

Corey

___________________

Hi Corey,

Monday at noon works great for me. Just let me know where, and I’ll make sure I’m there on time.

I appreciate you taking the time to read over our site and our pamphlet. To answer you question: My goal for the meeting is to speak with a concerned citizen who has had experience taking up issues with the city and garnering support for your idea. I will be sure to go over all the fluoride information provided on the website before we meet. And while I’m sure I’ll have questions pertaining to the fluoride issue, I really want to learn more about your efforts involved in fighting this issues (roadblocks, avenues of support, etc.)…to learn more about what it takes to make change and where you see your efforts leading.

I hope that makes sense. If not, please let me know.
Looking forward to the meeting!

Justin

Justin T. Lana, MSc-Global Health
PhD Student, Environment
Duke University – Nicholas School of the Environment

__________________

Hi Justin,

Ok, that sounds fine. You might be surprised at the information I have to share so hopefully you come prepared for that!

Why don’t we meet at ————————— which you can look up on Google maps, it’s not far from my office.

Thanks for having open ears,

Corey

__________________

11:30 sounds great.

I will see you then!
Really looking forward to it.
________________________
Hi Justin,
Thank you for the lunch on Monday. I really enjoyed our discussion & hope you got a lot out of it.
I wanted to follow up on a couple items that I mentioned & thought you might find useful in your efforts.

1) I mentioned a WTVD news report that features me and my efforts, very fair presentment of the issue:

2) Public Health Board Meeting ended with me thrown out by a deputy sheriff –

3) Below is an email thread with one of your Duke peers which never amounted to much…but reminded me of the “forum” you mentioned as one of the possibilities with your ELISS work.
Last but not least I wanted to make you aware that I made an audio recording of our discussion on Monday.  This is something I habitually do as a journalistic practice when I give interviews or meet with people from the media for my own legal and personal protection.   I did not inform you of this at the time because I feel that the content and character of discourse changes drastically when an individual is aware that they are being recorded, and I did not want to contaminate our interaction.
I am letting you know this now because I listened to the audio recording on my way to work this morning & felt that it would be a highly valuable contribution to the fluoridation discussion if it were made available online.  Out of courtesy I wanted to know what are your thoughts about me publishing the recording accompanied by an article about our discussion?
Please let me know.
Thanks,
Corey
_____________________

Hi Corey,

Thanks for the email. I’m glad that you found the time to meet with me. As I mentioned on Monday, I knew your perspective would be much different than what I’ve encountered so far.
I will check out these links shortly (I’m finishing up with finals this week). I’ve read through your “conversation” with Jennifer Alspach, it’s unfortunate that nothing worked out. I’m not sure who she is or what group she was with, but it sure would have been interesting to see an actual debate take place over the issue of fluoridation.
Corey, I appreciate your informing me that our conversation was recorded; however, I don’t feel comfortable with it shared publicly at this time.
Please let me know if you have any questions. I hope you have a great time in S. Africa and the UAE. I will keep you posted on what I learn moving forward, our local forum, etc.
Thank you
Justin
_____________________

Hi Justin,

I forgot to add the video of me attending the water plant. The superintendent actually gave me a tour of the whole plant but the only piece I was interested in for my purposes was the fluoridation facility.  As mentioned he says casually that it is highly corrosive.

Corey visit Fluoridation Station:

Fluoride Spill in Illinois eats through concrete:

While I’m disappointed that you aren’t comfortable with the publication of our discussion I understand and will respect that.  I want to provide you an opportunity to revisit our discussion in case this gives you reason to change your mind. I know you’re busy but I think this is highly valuable and would be good for the public to consume. You can find the recording at the link below.

[Deleted]

I look forward to hearing about future updates on your work.

Take good care,

Corey

Hi Justin,

How are things going with your project @ ELISS? Did you get a chance to see any of my follow up items?  I was thinking about you when I was out of the country, because I noticed all the bottled water where I was had a detailed label spelling out the parts per million for several different minerals/metals and it reminded me of our discussion.

I have been playing catch up all week since I got back from South Africa & UAE. I hope you’ve been doing well.

_________________

Hi Corey,

Thank you for reaching out. I have also been out of the country (Panama) and have just started to get caught up with my work and ELISS related projects.

It was so great to get away; but coming back into ten days of disconnect from email/work is a little daunting (and I hope excuses my slow response).

ELISS is going well. We have about three weeks before our mid-year meeting in DC. I am not sure if I explained this earlier, but we’ve essentially been “scoping” drinking water issues since January. At our meeting in DC, we’ll meet with other campuses and decide what topic/issue(s)/etc. that we should focus on. I’m looking forward to hearing what the other campuses have to say about their communities as well as getting a little more direction on where we are headed.

As far as our previous discussion, I’ve gotten through the links and spent the last hour listening to our discussion. I have no problem with you posting it online, and you can keep my name attached to it if you like, but I do ask that you provide a little context in the description of where you post it. Namely 1) I’m not a water scholar or expert 2) that this was meant to be a discussion and not a formal interview 3) i was unaware of the recording during our discussion but have since agreed to its posting.

Corey, I look forward to keeping you in the loop. Keep in mind that I’ll be in the Peruvian Amazon for about ten weeks this summer, so if you don’t hear anything it doesn’t mean that I’ve forgotten about you; its just that I’m out of the loop myself or without email.

Thank you,

Justin

Justin T. Lana, MSc-Global Health
PhD Student, Environment
Duke University – Nicholas School of the Environment

Durham Citizens,

The Williams water  treatment plant that supplies the city of Durham with your tap water spends over $100,000 of YOUR money adding an admitted dangerous substance to the drinking water.  Ironically, the city of Durham’s own Duke University in cooperation with Professor Brian A. Burt conducted a study when this writer was living in Durham at the age of 4-5 years.   The study involved the city turning off public water fluoridation for a period of 11 months during 1990-1991, whilst observing the incisor changes in over 1800 K-5 aged children in Durham, NC.  The study concluded no increase in dental cavities (the very claimed benefit of fluoridation), but a decrease in fluorosis – the Center for Disease Control’s admitted malady to fluoridating public water supplies.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10728978

ABSTRACT

Durham, NC, fluoridated since 1962, had an 11-month cessation of fluoridation between September, 1990, and August, 1991. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of this break on the development of caries and fluorosis in children. Study participants were continuously-resident children in Kindergarten through Grade 5 in Durham’s elementary schools. There were 1696 children, 81.4% of those eligible, for whom a questionnaire was completed and clinical data recorded. Age cohorts were defined by a child’s age at the time that fluoridation ceased. Caries was recorded in children in the Birth Cohort through Cohort 3, and fluorosis for children in Cohorts 1 through 5. Caries was assessed in the primary first and second molars according to the decayed-filled index; fluorosis on the labial surfaces of the upper permanent central and lateral incisors was assessed by the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. Mother’s education was associated with caries; higher education of the mother had an odds ratio of 0.53 (95% CI 0.40, 0.76) for caries in the child. No cohort effects could be discerned for caries. Overall prevalence of fluorosis was 44%. Prevalence in Cohorts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 was 39.8%, 32.3%, 33.0%, 62.3%, and 57.1%, respectively. These cohort differences remained statistically significant in regression analysis. It was concluded that while the break had little effect on caries, dental fluorosis is sensitive to even small changes in fluoride exposure from drinking water, and this sensitivity is greater at 1 to 3 years of age than at 4 or 5 years.

This incredible hipocrisy and public health danger should be stopped as soon as possible!  Spread the video and the study to all mindful citizens!
Get Involved – thegldnrule@gmail.com